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 Solo Travel in Australia

How Long Do I Need | Accommodation | Tours | Travelling Around | From the Airport | Border Crossings | FAQs

Solo travel in Australia is so easy. Australia is known for its travelling culture so wherever you choose to start travelling you’re guaranteed to meet others en route. Backpacking Australia is really popular especially along the East Coast which is famous for its party atmosphere. Because of its ease, many gap-year and younger travellers choose to visit here to experience life down under before entering the job market.

Travelling solo in Australia as a woman is fine as most people are friendly but be prepared for some strange souls in the outback, especially in Katherine and Tenant Creek. Oz is great for a first timer. There are endless supplies of hostels and hotels and everyone speaks English. It really is a traveller’s dream.

Solo Travel in Australia

The Whitsundays (photo @ Megan Lynna)

Places in Australia

Queensland

You can’t get much further from home than Australia and a trip down under is ideal for solo travel. It has sun, sand and plenty of surfer dudes to keep you entertained but with so many territories to see, where do you start?

If you like to party and meet other travellers then the East coast is the place to begin; fly into Cairns and travel down the Queensland coast. Cairns is also the gateway to Northern Australia where the rainforest meets the sea and from here you can explore Cape Tribulation which is home to thousands of mammals, reptiles and plants. Spend an evening in an eco lodges to get back in touch with nature.

Take the scenic railway through the Daintree National Park, see the waterfalls at Atherton Tablelands or take a stroll at the Mossman Gorge then relax at Cow Bay or the Four Mile Beach at Port Douglas.

The Great Barrier Reef runs along the Queensland coast and is a metropolis of coral and underwater life. Introductory dives are available for those who want to experience the reef for the first time from Fitzroy or Green Island (the instructor will even hold your hand). Once you’ve experienced this wonder of the world head South for the real Australia where you can sample some Bundaberg rum in the fruit picking region of Oz.

Solo Travel in Australia

Cape Tribulation (photo @ Petrina Wong)

Magnetic Island is a boat away from Townsville and they say that once you come here, you won’t want to leave. It’s a great place to hire a moke and bomb around the island but apart from the secluded beach of Radical Bay and the dairy-free ice-cream parlour, this island is no different to any other (unless you want to horse ride in the sea).

Fraser Island is a definite must-see. It's a huge sand island with stunning lakes where you can drive a 4WD along the beach. This is more of a camping experience but beware of the dingos and the tiger sharks. Experience the great nightlife at Airlie Beach then take a sailing trip around the islands of the Whitsundays.

Whitehaven Beach is one of the most beautiful beaches in the world and you can see manta rays swimming along the shoreline. It’s also an ideal spot to clean any dull-looking jewellery in the crystal clear waters.

There’s not much in Brisbane except for the late Steve Irwin’s Brisbane Zoo and a riverside park. If you need more nightlife and some surf then Surfers Paradise is the place to be with its ‘Miami feel’ and has plenty of fun for a solo traveller.

This is the place to hang out, catch some sun and take a ride in the many theme parks. Choose from Dreamworld, Movie World, Sea World or Wet ‘n’ Wild. Stay in a hostel to find others willing to come along for the ride.

Just north of Brisbane is a region called Noosa with secluded beaches and cute arty shops with plenty of restaurants around Hastings Street. The main beach is great for swimming and there are no stingers here. If you prefer the hippy scene, visit Byron Bay for its incredibly laid back vibe or take a trip to Nimbin the ‘alternative capital of Australia’ for its arty, colouful community and lost souls.

Victoria

Victoria is the next territory and known for its variety of sporting events. Melbourne hosts the Australian Open, the Grand Prix, Melbourne Cup and Aussie Rules football at the MGM. It’s also the fashion capital of Australia and is great for shopping and back-street cafe culture but you’ll need a local to find its exclusive hidden nightlife.

You’ll feel more at home in Melbourne with its four seasons in one day but if you’re looking for a more holiday-feel then take the tram to St Kilda where you can sit al fresco and watch people roller blading along the promenade.

From Melbourne you can cruise along the Great Ocean Road, one of Australia’s epic drives. Bells Beach is en route and has great point breaks and was actually the setting of the film with the same name. Off the coast of Melbourne is Tasmania, which has so much to see that we’ve given it its own Solo Travel in Tasmania page!

Solo Travel in Australia

Byron Bay (photo @ Emma Tyndall)

New South Wales

Sydney lies in New South Wales and although it is not the country’s capital it has everything you would expect to find in one. Australia’s actual capital, Canberra, is 250km inland and is worth a look with the Parliament Building overlooking the lake as the main focal point of the city.

Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House are a must see. Sydney makes solo travel in Australia so easy with so much to see and do. Take a boat ride around the harbour or travel across to Taronga Zoo for spectacular pictures of giraffes against a Sydney back drop. Darling Harbour at dusk is the perfect place to people watch and has some great bars. If you prefer somewhere more upmarket, Wallamaloo has swanky restaurants and plenty of yachts to admire.

If you like markets, you’ll love Paddington market which is reminiscent of Covent Garden with arty stalls. Known for its surfing, Bondi is the most popular of the beaches but the waves of Coogee, Manly and Bronte are just as good. Dee Why beach is lesser known and is a great escape from the crowds.

Solo Travel in Australia

Blue Mountains (photo @ Lindsay Deutsch)

South Australia

Adelaide is the capital of South Australia and there is a lot to do both in and around this city which has a country-town feel. Get out into the Adelaide Hills to see waterfalls, fairytale villages and the world’s largest rocking horse.

Sample wines at the Barossa Valley and see how chocolate is made in the chocolate factory, camp overnight at Wilpena Pound, a natural amphitheatre within the Flinders Rangers. It’s a unique experience and you need an entry permit to enter the park.

Kangaroo Island is worth a visit and is only 90 minutes from the mainland. You can get up close and personal to seals on Seal Bay and join a wildlife safari to learn about the Australian animals. The beach-side suburb of Glenelg is worth a stroll and there are great restaurants here. If you don’t fancy getting any tan lines as you sunbathe, Maslin Beach is the place for nudists.

From Adelaide you can travel by train on the Ghan across the outback to the Red Centre, home to many aborigines or to the modern city of Perth via the Indian Pacific railway. Perth is popular with expats and is only worth seeing if you have the time as it’s a long way from the rest of the country. There are some great beaches such as Cottesloe and Scarborough. Kings Park is a tranquil place to relax and see black swans.

Fremantle is a vibrant little city with buzzing markets but the main attraction has got to be the old prison, which gives you an eye-opening tour of prison life. Rottnest Island is unique and you can cycle around this wildlife nature reserve.

When you stray away from the cities into the more male-dominated outback, you may find you get more attention as a woman travelling solo and being whistled at is not uncommon. If you don’t mind the attention, it’s worth a trip to see the real Australia. You shouldn’t miss Coober Pedy, the world’s only underground town where you can sleep in an abandoned mine shaft.

Solo Travel in Australia

The Great Ocean Road (photo @ Petrina Wong)

Northern Territory

The Red Centre is steeped in Aboriginal culture and resembles something out of the Flintstones. Learn how to throw a boomerang, ride in a hot air balloon or play a didgeridoo at Alice Springs.

Visit the Flying Doctors Museum or the reptile centre to learn more about Australia’s snakes and lizards. Then it’s on to the wonder that is Ayres Rock or Uluru, as known by the Aborigines, which can be reached by a six hour drive or a flight.

There’s much controversy about climbing the rock but a walk around the burial caves and ancient art paintings at the base is a good substitute. Don’t forget to include Kings Canyon (the setting for the movie, Priscilla Queen of the Desert) and the Olgas when you go.

Head north to Darwin via Lichfield or Kakadu National Park where you can see crocodiles and wetlands or hire a bike at Katherine Gorge and cycle to the springs. If you’re going to the Northern Territory it’s worth investing in a fly net for this tropical climate.

Tennant Creek is an odd little place and half of its population are aborigines. If you can handle the strangeness it’s worth a stop to see the Devils Marbles, an important site from the Dreamtime or visit Kalgoorlie for a real gold rush town.

Solo Travel in Australia

Perth City (photo @ Shannon Lane)

Western Australia

Cruise past the rugged red cliffs of the Kimberley region then west to Broome, known for its pearling industry to drive a 4×4 along the northern stretch of Cable Beach. Many people leave out this region but if you have the time it is worth travelling to.

Australia is the place to sleep under the stars in a swag and experience a hot sunny Christmas. If you decide to spend the Christmas holidays in Australia you may be lucky enough to catch a glimpse of Santa jet skiing along Sydney Harbour. There really is no other place like it.

starCombine your trip to Australia with a stopover in Asia.

cautionBeware of box jellyfish in the sea during wet season (December to February). Stinger suits are provided if you intend to snorkel.

Accommodation in Australia - solo travel in Australia

Accommodation in Australia

Australia is brimming with accommodation and you'll never be short of places to stay whether you prefer hostels or a swanky city apartment. Finding accommodation is easy with motels, farmstays and even boat houses to spend a night or two. Booking.com offers BnBs and hotels from 3 star to the luxurious 5 star and even includes dorm rooms if you're travelling on a budget. You can also use HotelsCombined to find and compare accommodation rates in Australia.

Guest houses are a sociable way of staying in family homes. Plus there’s Airbnb which connects you to unique travel experiences and isn’t just limited to staying in a local’s spare room. Save $20 off your first stay with this Airbnb link.

Bounce, Sydney

Bounce – Sydney 

Situated opposite the Central Railway Station and next to a bus stop, this hostel is in a great location to explore the city whether you want to go to Bondi Beach or the CBD. The staff are really friendly and accommodating, and will help with whatever you need. Plus, only guests are allowed in so it’s really safe. There is also a restaurant and a terrace too. Choose from a female-only dorm, mixed dorm or private room.

 United Backpackers – Melbourne 

Located in the Central Business District (CBD), United Backpackers is in the perfect spot to explore the city of Melbourne. You’ll find lockers for your belongings and a manned reception which is open 24 hours. The onsite bar makes it easy to find others to explore with. They even have female only dorm rooms too. Prices start from £26 for a 12 bed dorm.

                                                                   

Calypso Inn Backpackers Resort, Cairns

Calypso Inn Backpackers Resort – Cairns

If you are looking to socialise in Cairns, Calypso Inn is a great place to stay. They have a bar to meet others and a swimming pool to cool off from the Aussie heat. It is also close to the esplanade so you don’t have far to walk after a night out. They also arrange shuttles from the airport. Choose from a female only dorm, mixed dorm or a single room if you need your space. Prices from £15 for a dorm bed. 

Australia tours - solo travel in Australia

Ayres Rock (photo @ Kate Eastham)

Tours in Australia

Australian Tour Packages

G Adventures

With Australia being such a sociable country, you’ll never be short of company travelling Australia alone. But if you feel more comfortable in a group for either part of your trip or the whole duration, G Adventures is a responsible tour company which mainly caters towards budget travellers. Most tours have an average of 10 people and there is no upper age limit. Once you book your trip you pay extra for any excursions you want to do when you’re there.

Adventures range from 3 days on the Great Ocean Road to 28 days for a complete Australia tour. Explore the east coast from Sydney to Cairns on a 16 day trip from £1849, travel the Red Centre to Adelaide from £639 for 8 days, or join others for a 3 Day Uluru Safari from £400. I have personally used G Adventures and recommend them as a solo female friendly company. 

Intrepid

Intrepid Travel is similar to G Adventures with an average of 12 people on each tour. Over 50% of people who book their trips are solo travellers. They tend to use hotels instead of hostels and have a more comfortable style of accommodation hence the trips can appear a bit more than G Adventures. Their tours range from 2 days to 22 days and include adventures such as an overnight camping trip in Uluru or overland from Darwin to Perth.

With both tour companies you share a room with someone of the same gender or you can pay extra for your own room.

World Expeditions – Offers trekking holidays to Australia and have a female only adventure to Tasmania for 6 days.

Australian Day Tours

The following day tour companies have been recommended by solo female travellers.

  • Lets Go Surfing – Fancy a surfing lesson on Bondi beach? Check out Let's Go Surfing.
  • Big Bus Tours – See the landmarks of Sydney and the famous Bondi beach on this hop-on, hop-off bus.

Viator 

If you prefer day tours, Viator has a plethora to choose from. As a TripAdvisor company each tour is handpicked and pre-vetted to make such you get the best experience. From biking around Melbourne, visiting Sydney's Harbour or delving into the history of Brisbane you'll find something for any kind of solo. 

solo travel in Australia

Sydney Harbour Bridge – Photo @ Petrina Wong

Travelling Around Australia

Travelling around Australia, the distances between places are vast and long. There’s a great bus network with Greyhound and epic train journeys and a rail pass is a good way of saving money. If you’re limited on time use internal flights between the cities: Qantas, Jetstar and Virgin Australia operate domestically.

Renting a car is only recommended for those long distances when you have company to travel with. With so many backpackers to choose from there are plenty of people to keep you company.

Coach tours are also a great way for travelling Australia. You get to see areas of the country and share the experience with your fellow passengers. Choose Oz Experience for a party atmosphere or AAT Kings for more civilised companionship.

starTo hire a car we recommend pre-booking car hire with Avis so you can collect your car when you arrive at the airport.

How long do I need? 

If you’re looking to see all of Australia’s sites in a single trip it can be difficult to achieve unless you have plenty of time. Most people when they solo travel in Australia start with Sydney and travel their way up the coast.

You'll find more travellers along this route so pairing up with others is more likely than venturing to the Northern territory. Within two weeks you can travel from Adelaide to Darwin or Sydney to Cairns.

From the Airport

From the Airport 

There are a choice of airports to fly into when travelling to Australia. Below are the main airports in the country.

Sydney – Airport Link departs the International and Domestic Terminals every 10 minutes and only takes 15 minutes to get into the city.

Cairns – Airport shuttle buses run from the airport to the city centre, Northern Beaches, Palm Cove, Cape Tribulation and Mission Beach. Some accommodation provide their own courtesy coach so check when booking. The time to the city is only 10 minutes.

Melbourne – SkyBus offer an express service to the city every 10 minutes or there are public buses and taxis for the 30 minute journey.

Brisbane – Coachtrans coaches offer direct transfers to Brisbane City departing every 30 minutes. Trains take 22 minutes to Brisbane City or 90 minutes to the Gold Coast (Nerang). For transfers to the Sunshine Coast, Sun-Air operate an hourly bus service until 8.50pm.

Perth – Public transport operates into the city. Check here for buses. You'll find Perth airport car hire if you prefer having your own transport to get around.

Adelaide – JetBus services travel from the airport to the city, Glenelg and the North-Eastern suburbs. Skylink Airport Shuttle offer a regular bus service for the 15 minute journey to the city.

starFeel more confident with someone waiting for you at the airport when you pre-book a transfer with Hoppa, a reliable and safe service for solo females.

Border Crossings

Travelling onwards (check visas before you travel)

With Australia neighbouring countries such as New Zealand, Fiji, Bali or Papua New Guinea, your trip doesn’t have to end here. There’s so much more to see! Fly to New Zealand, Bali, or the Pacific Islands.

If you prefer a leisurely pace, cruise from port to port in Australia and then onward to New Zealand or Tasmania. Asia and North America are also accessible by boat or sail back to the UK on a 40 day cruise.

starNovember to March is the best season for cruises to Australia.

Where can I go from here?

planelistPapua New Guinea – 4 hours

planelistNew Zealand – 5.5 hours

planelistBali – 4 hours

FAQ's

FAQs

  • Can I drink the water? Yes.
  • Is tipping expected? No.
  • Fixed price or barter? Fixed Price.
  • Any ATMs? Yes.
  • Which side of the road do they drive? Left.
  • Good for vegetarians? Yes.
  • Any seven wonders of the world? The Great Barrier Reef.

*This page contains affiliate links. These are of no extra charge to you and Girl about the Globe donates 10% of all affiliate sales to War Child, protecting children in war zones.

 

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46 thoughts on “Solo Travel in Australia

  1. claudia

    Brisbane and Byron Bay are not part of the Gold Coast. Brisbane is the capital of Queensland, Byron Bay is at the top end of New South Wales.

    Reply
  2. M.Spitz

    Hi thanks for your article, it is very informative, i will be going to Sydney solo in September. Can you recommenced any good seafood restaurants in Sydney?

    Reply
  3. Judy Pliner

    Aloha! Your website is truly a great source of information & inspiration!!! Thanks for doing this for all us Solo traveler’s, really makes it easier to take that leap.
    Wondering if you have advice re: Lord Howe Island, Heron Island, Hamilton Island, Magnetic Island, Hayman Island, Fitzroy Island. Fraser Island & Hervey Bay are on my to-do list, but I’m not sure about how to fit in all these island in 17 days this August. My goals are snorkeling the GBR, experiencing the pristine beaches, and incredible wildlife, too.
    Thanks in advance for any advice you have.

    Reply
    1. Nilanjana

      Hi!
      I plan to travel solo to Australia this October. Travelling solo for the first time can be daunting. Any suggestions will only help me further with planning my trip. I am looking at 10-12 days. The broad itinerary is like Mumbai-Sydney-Cairns-Melbourne-Canberra-Sydney-Mumbai. Is it doable? Also if you could guide me about how to go about booking trips to Blue Mountains, Scuba Diving (at Cairns), Great Ocean Drive (coach tour is fine, i am not a very confident driver, that too in a foreign country). I have joined the FB group (hope you accept my request).
      Looking forward to your guidance… Thanks 🙂

      Reply
      1. Girl about the Globe Post author

        Hi Nilanjana, thanks for your message. I would say that 10-12 days isn’t that long to do all of those places unless you are doing activities every day and taking internal flights. You mentioned that you joined the FB group so post the same message in there to get some more advice x

        Reply
  4. Alannah

    Hi,

    Travelling from Victoria, B.C. in January 2017. Bit nervous. Any other single females going to Australia around that time from Victoria?

    Reply
  5. michelle

    wow! i m so tempted. was thinking of going solo trips to Europe, but was fearful because i hadn’t done solo before. sounds like australia is a better choice..

    Reply
  6. Lindsey

    Hello,
    I’ve found your site very informative, thankyou. I’m going flying to Cairns in November and I have about 3 weeks to get to Sydney to meet my BF who is coming out to see me for Christmas. I was just wandering about the best way to get from Cairns to Sydney, but missing out Brisbane as we are going to do that together.
    I have requested to join the Facebook group too as I am over there for 6 months. Hoping to work in Melbourne.

    Reply
  7. Carmen

    Hello! Thank you very much for your article! Very useful 🙂 im planning to go to Australia and new zealand next summer, one month Australia and two weeks new zealand. Do you reccomend renting a car going by myself or is it better internal flights, buses and trains?
    Im planning to do the East coast ( cairns to Sydney) adelaide, Melbourne, uluru, Tasmania and all i can visit for the whole month. Your tips are more than welcome

    Reply
    1. Girl about the Globe Post author

      Thanks Carmen. I definitely recommend visiting Tasmania – it’s so stunning and natural. If you only have one month maybe take a bus for half of the journey up the coast – Adelaide, Melbourne, Tasmania (you can get the ferry here), then fly to Uluru. I was there over 10 years ago so I would recommend joining the Girls about the Globe Facebook group as some of the girls there have recently been or are heading to Oz so they can offer you some better tips. Here’s the link to join: https://www.facebook.com/groups/369115206621307/

      Reply
  8. Marni

    Looking to travel solo to Australia from the end of november to mid december 2016, so very soon!! I have no idea where I should begin. Should I go with a tour group? I’m a young 40 year old single female and don’t want to get stuck with a bunch of old people, ha, but I do not want to have to drive while I am there and happy to fly from location to location. Thinking Sydney – Melbourne – Cairns – and the outback somewhere? Not necessarily in that order. No clue how to start!

    Reply
    1. Girl about the Globe Post author

      Hi Marni, I’m 40 too 🙂 There are internal flights you could take and also a great bus service called Greyhound. Sydney, Melbourne, Cairns sounds good then you could fly to Alice Springs in the outback. I was there over 10 years ago so I would recommend joining the Girls about the Globe Facebook group as some of the girls there have recently been or are heading to Oz so they can offer you some better tips. Here’s the link to join: https://www.facebook.com/groups/369115206621307/

      Reply
  9. shweta

    Hello!
    I’m planning to visit Australia in the month of January, 2017. Will be there for 3 weeks. Is there any way I can team up with fellow solo travelers and go around? I’m 25 🙂

    Reply
  10. Shy

    Hi
    I have just sent a request to join your Facebook group, I am looking to travel to Australia in April from 14th till 2nd May (nothing booked yet). I will be travelling solo for the first time so a little nervous, ideally I would prefer to join a tour group or other solo travellers and was hoping you can help me prepare an itinerary please?

    Reply
  11. Rosie

    Hi
    I am planning to go solo backpacking around the east coast in August/ September. Do you think its still worth going in the winter months -I am traveling alone so am hoping to meet other backpackers there or would it be very quiet?
    Thank you

    Reply
  12. Kathryn Lloyd-Williams

    Hi I’m aiming to travel to Australia for the first time on my own Feb/March and hoping to travel aroundSydney and nearby areas. I’m not a confident traveler so I’ve sent a request to join the facebook page as any advice and tips on how to travel solo would be really helpful.
    Thanks,.
    Kath

    Reply
  13. Sharon

    I’m traveling solo to Australia for a month in February. I did send a request to join the group. Thanks so much!

    Reply
  14. Preethi

    Hey, this is really informative, thank you so much! I’m visiting Cairns in early June, and am planning on visiting the Great Barrier Reef then. I was thinking of clubbing a couple days in Gold Coast and maybe 4 days in Sydney after that. Does that sound doable? What would you suggest?

    Reply
    1. Girl about the Globe Post author

      Hi Preethi. Oh wow. June isn’t far away. Clubbing on the East Coast sounds cool! I really liked Surfers Paradise http://www.barsandnightclubs.com.au/gold-coast/ You can take the bus from Surfers to Sydney but it takes about 17 hours which is doable if it’s a night bus or look at taking an internal flight instead. Rome2Rio is good for working out travelling around https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Surfers-Paradise/Sydney. Fee free to join our Facebook community too x https://www.facebook.com/groups/369115206621307/

      Reply
  15. chantelle

    Hi, I found this information really useful as I’m travelling solo for the first time ever so I’m a bit apprehensive. Would you recommend booking on to one of the tours before I get there or just fly in and go from there? Also what is the job market like for travellers? Is it easy to find work for short periods of time?

    Thank you

    Reply
    1. Girl about the Globe Post author

      Hi Chantelle, Australia is really easy to travel around as a solo so you don’t need to take a tour if you don’t want to. I used the Greyhound bus to get around, the trains, internal flights, hired a car, and then did a week with Oz Experience just to see what a tour felt like. It was fun and took me off the beaten track. I worked in an office in Sydney and Melbourne and also fruit picked on the coast. This was a few years ago so I’m not sure if it has changed. Are you a member of our Facebook community as someone who has been there recently may be able to help more about the job market now? Here’s the link to join https://www.facebook.com/groups/369115206621307/ x

      Reply
  16. Mike

    Hi. is it easy to get a Australian Tourist Visa if you are a pinoy solo traveler? Like i have Korean and Taiwan visa and traveled to mostly asian countries, i have work and sufficient funds for only 4 days tour trip in Sydney? Hope to hear from you. 🙂

    Reply
  17. Brooke Fitzgearld

    Hi! Currently I have a trip booked to allow 7 full days on ground in Australia with flights to/from Sydney. With this being my first trip to Australia, I’m trying to figure out if I should switch one flight to Melbourne and travel in between the two. I really like the idea of hitting Cairens/Sydney/Melbourne based on your blog but with such short time, I’m not with the travel between. Or should I do day trips from Sydney? Thoughts would be appreciated! I’m so grateful I found your blog and just joined the FB page! One other question, have you take an overnight train? Thought that might be an option as well.
    Thanks!
    Brooke
    USA

    Reply
  18. Melanie

    Hi!
    I am 27 and going on my first ever solo trip in mid November this year. I am really anxious and not a clue what I am doing it was just a spur of the moment decision. I am thinking of starting off in Cairns (hopefully meeting my best friend for Christmas day) then heading south along the coast. How easy is it to get accommodation over the Christmas period? Also would you recommend starting in Cairns and working your way down? I would love to travel with someone and I am really hoping I meet people!!!

    Reply
    1. Girl about the Globe Post author

      Hi Melanie, I would pre-book accommodation for the Christmas period as it’s also their summer. Yes, I would recommend starting in Cairns and working your way down. I used Greyhound buses which are good and also Oz Experience x

      Reply
    2. Jess

      Hi Melanie,

      I am also travelling solo in mid November- hoping to start in cairns and work my way down to Sydney before I fly home in February. Have you made any plans yet? I have no idea where to start with hostel booking etc!!

      Reply
    3. Natasha

      Hi Melanie,

      I’m 26 and doing my first solo trip, I’m heading to Asia first doing a tour then heading to Australia mid-dec and nothing planned as yet as really worrying what to do over the christmas/new year period.
      II’ve just asked on the group for some suggestions, but we could always meet up along the way.
      I’m definitely doing the east coast, just not sure what way I’m starting yet possibly Sydney upwards but I’ll wait for some suggestions.

      Reply
  19. Imms

    Hi,

    My name Imms. I’m planning to have solo trip to Brisbane on Aug ’18. At first, I will have training in Camp Warrawee for 8 days then I’m free to go. Any suggestions, this is my 1st trip to Australia. Can you advise me for the transport also, pls? How many days should I extend my trip? Thanks in advanced.

    Reply
    1. Girl about the Globe Post author

      Hi Imms, I would suggest Sydney and Melbourne if it’s your first time to Oz. The distances are long so it depends how long you have in the country. Taking internal flights is quicker if you are short on time or you can take the Greyhound Bus or Oz Experience. Have you joined our Facebook community? Some of the girls are in Australia at the moment. Here is the link to join https://www.facebook.com/groups/369115206621307/

      Reply
  20. Heather

    Hi,
    I’m traveling solo to Brisbane for about 4 days in November. Please suggest any places of interest must go in Brisbane as well public transport to take. Thanks in advanced.

    Reply

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